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A guide to choosing the right size

Blackmoor Nursery is one of very few Nurseries in the UK offering gardeners the opportunity to buy Rhubarb crowns direct from our Nursery. 

Establishing the Rhubarb Bed. A new rhubarb bed is best raised from divisions planted out in November, although it can be set out as late as March. Old crowns should be split, using a spade, into wedge shaped pieces with two or three buds on the outer edge, the inner part can usually be pared away with a knife (although old crowns are often hollow). Many growers, especially older ones, say that you should always leave the crowns on the surface to expose them to a hard frost before splitting them. Rhubarb is not fussy as to soil but should be planted in slightly raised beds if the soil is very heavy. It does however need an open site, as it will not tolerate shade. Prepare the soil carefully by digging to two spits (spade depths), the roots go deep, and work in plenty of farmyard manure or compost as you go.

All orders are despatched in one delivery. If your order contains both bare root and container grown plants then we can only despatch when all plants are ready.

situation

In choosing a site remember that the leaves are heavy and reach at least 2 feet (60 cm) all round the crown. Set the divisions 21/2-3 ft (75-90 cm) apart with the buds at or just below the surface. It is strongly recommended that you do not gather any sticks in the first year of a new rhubarb bed. The first good crop will come in the second or third year following planting.

Prior to planting eliminate all perennial weeds. If the soil is acid mix in lime, add organic matter such as compost or manure to light sandy soils. On heavier soils, which are poorly drained, planting on raised beds is beneficial. The incorporation of sand is also helpful. Before planting dig in a handful of fertiliser such as ‘Growmore’ also a light sprinkling of Magnesium Sulphate (Epsom Salts) to each planting position.

fruitgrowers handbook

Blackmoor Fruitgrowers Handbook

delivery charges

Collection - If you would like to collect your trees then use this option. Note the collection is from the Wholesale Nursery office between Monday-Friday only. Please allow 1 working days for your order to be processed prior to collection date.

We are not a Garden Centre or retail Nursery. Orders can be placed via our website and the collection option can be selected at the checkout. Your order will then be ready for you to collect during our normal opening hours which are Monday-Friday 07.30-16.30. Our plants are grown in fields that can be 2 miles away from our office so it is not possible to just turn up and select your own trees.

Delivery Charges - The delivery charge is worked out from the weight and the size of the plant. We have several rates that apply to UK mainland addresses. The lower postal rates range from £2.80 - £5.70, will be applied to smaller orders of the lighter plants like currants, raspberries, gooseberries, blackberries, asparagus and strawberries although larger orders will go into the £10.00 rate. A higher rate of £18.00 - £32.00 will be charged for deliveries to European Countries and GY KW IV AB PH KW HS ZE IM BT DD JE PO30 PO31 PO32 PO33 PO34 PO35 PO36 PO37 PO38 PO39 PO40 PO41 Postcodes. Once you have put together your order the delivery charge will show before payment. All orders are despatched in one delivery.

To take advantage of a promotional code or gift voucher this must be entered into the redeem code box at the checkout. Discounts cannot be given once an order is completed and any codes have not been used.

Victoria

Rhubarb Crowns | Genus Rheum x hybridum | Victoria Rhubarb Crowns For Sale | Buy Online

Rhubarb Victoria crowns for sale - Victoria grows well in open ground and forces well when roots or clumps are lifted after frost and placed in a dark position - under a greenhouse bench shaded with black polythene. Victoria is chosen for their high yield, outstanding flavour and early cropping (April onwards). 

Rhubarb Victoria : Plant crowns at a 1 metre spacing.

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Available To Order In Early June
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9 May 20 | Frank Boyle

Heathy plant delivered in excellent condition. Kept updated with delivery. First class service.

17 Dec 15 | Richard

I have planted a superb Victoria Crown in a perfect bed and could not be more pleased. Thank you very much.

30 Apr 15 | Valerie Shepherd

Very healthy root crown arrived well packed and very healthy. Service from this supplier is 2nd to none. xxxx

9 Mar 15 | J Monds

Good looking crown, looking forward to the crumbles now.

28 Feb 15 | Jimmac

Five stars for growth of the plant. It's a very healthy and quite an ornamental plant. Not THE best flavoured variety but worth growing all the same.

11 Nov 14 | Emma

Great service, looking forward to the first harvest.

28 May 14 | Beryl Saunders

Very please again with my second order but not so excited about the large snail that hitched a ride in the box. Thankfully no damage to the plants.

7 Nov 13 | Nicola Hardie

I'm most impressed with the service provided. Fingers crossed for some fabulous rhubarb! I would recommend your company without any doubt at all. Many thanks for the telephone advice too.

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Rhubarb Victoria Growing Tips.

CARE GUIDE FOR RHUBARB

Establishing the Rhubarb Bed: A new rhubarb bed is best raised from divisions planted out in November, although it can be set out as late as March. Old crowns should be split, using a spade, into wedge shaped pieces with two or three buds on the outer edge, the inner part can usually be pared away with a knife (although old crowns are often hollow). Many growers, especially older ones, say that you should always leave the crowns on the surface to expose them to a hard frost before splitting them.

Please note: Do not pre-soak the bare root crowns prior to planting as they are liable to rot.

Rhubarb is not fussy as to soil but should be planted in slightly raised beds if the soil is very heavy. It does however need an open site, as it will not tolerate shade. Prepare the soil carefully by digging to two spits (spade depths), the roots go deep, and work in plenty of farmyard manure or compost as you go. In choosing a site remember that the leaves are heavy and reach at least 2 feet (60 cm) all round the crown. Set the divisions 21/2-3 ft (75-90 cm) apart with the buds at or just below the surface.

It is strongly recommended that you should not gather any sticks in the first year of a new rhubarb bed. The first good crop will come in the second or third year following planting.

Growing Rhubarb: Once you have established your plants the first basic principle of Rhubarb growing is that plants should be kept dry in winter and moist in summer. A covering of leaves applied in October and removed in February will help in winter and a mulch of compost, leaf mould or farmyard manure applied in April will keep moisture in the soil during the summer. Always make sure, however, that the soil is thoroughly moist before applying this summer mulch. If in doubt, always water well in dry seasons. The second basic principle is to remember that Rhubarb is essentially a leaf crop (no leaves, no stems) and that leaf crops need nitrogen. If you use farmyard manure for your summer mulch additional nitrogen will probably not be needed but a light dressing of nitrogenous fertiliser in March is recommended.

An established bed needs little attention beyond feeding and watering. You must, however, remove flower spikes as they appear and clear away dead leaves throughout summer and autumn. The heavy foliage smothers most weeds. The only serious diseases are viruses, which make the plant yellow and weak - these are incurable and affected plants should be destroyed. Slugs can be a problem - they seldom make serious attacks on the Rhubarb itself, but use the Rhubarb bed as a home from which to decimate other crops.

A well-planted Rhubarb bed will yield a satisfactory crop for ten or twelve years until the crowns get too many small buds. They should then be lifted, divided and replanted - leaving some crowns untouched to ensure continuity of supply.

Forcing Rhubarb: Rhubarb can be forced by lifting crowns in November and potting them up to be grown in the cellar, beneath the greenhouse staging or more simply by putting a bucket over the crowns in January. Generally speaking Rhubarb is best harvested for a period of four months from the time you take the first sticks. Three months if you have forced crowns.

This guide is for general information purposes only as site and soil conditions and requirements vary greatly.